Jump to content


Photo

Hubbard's Barley Water Formula For Babies Of Stupid Parents


  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 Rhythm

Rhythm

    Midshipman

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 749 posts
  • LocationWestern Hemisphere

Posted 19 September 2009 - 12:17 AM

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/17428115

" Am J Clin Dermatol. 2007;8(2):103-6.Links
Infantile scurvy: an old diagnosis revisited with a modern dietary twist.
Burk CJ, Molodow R.

Pediatric Dermatology, University of Miami, Miami, Florida 33125, USA. cynthiajburk@yahoo.com

Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is necessary for the formation of collagen, reducing free radicals, and aiding in iron absorption. Scurvy, a disease of dietary ascorbic acid deficiency, is uncommon today. Indeed, implementation of dietary recommendations largely eradicated infantile scurvy in the US in the early 1900s. We present a case of an otherwise healthy 2-year-old Caucasian girl who presented with refusal to walk secondary to pain in her lower extremities, generalized irritability, sleep disturbance, and malaise. The girl's parents described feeding the patient an organic diet recommended by the Church of Scientology that included a boiled mixture of organic whole milk, barley, and corn syrup devoid of fruits and vegetables. Physical examination revealed pale, bloated skin with edematous, violaceous gums and loosening of a few of her teeth. Dermatologic findings included xerosis, multiple scattered ecchymoses of the extremities, and perifollicular hemorrhage. Laboratory and radiographic evaluation confirmed the diagnosis of scurvy. The patient showed dramatic improvement after only 3 days of treatment with oral ascorbic acid and significant dietary modification. In this case report, we revisit the old diagnosis of scurvy with a modern dietary twist secondary to religious practices. This case highlights the importance of taking a detailed dietary history when evaluating diseases involving the skin."

#2 Rhythm

Rhythm

    Midshipman

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 749 posts
  • LocationWestern Hemisphere

Posted 19 September 2009 - 01:40 AM

Hubbard introduced his infamous baby food recipe in The Auditor number 6 in an article ironically called "Healthy Babies". It was later published in The Volunteer Minister's Handbook.
Here are some article excerpts with my comments and citations:
"Breast feeding babies may have a nostalgic background, particularly to a Freudian oriented medico, but real breast milk again is usually a poor ration"
Where is the published research study, Ron, that physicians who recommend breast feeding subscribe to Freud's doctrines? And where is the published research with a nutritional analysis of breast milk demonstrating that it is usually a poor ration? No facts? Flunk, Ron.

"Modern mothers smoke and sometimes drink. Smoking makes the milk very musty."
Which modern mothers smoke? Verifiable statistics please. And Ron, how would you know that smoking makes breast milk musty if you did not sample it yourself? How many lactating women did you taste test?

"Anyway, a nervous modern mother just can't deliver the right ration."
Published statistics please, Ron. Don't have any? You go to retread!

"The largest cause of upset in a baby's early life is just rations. As an old hand at this, I have straightened out more babies who were cross, not sleeping, getting sick and all, than it was easy to keep a record of."
No published research studies to demonstrate this, Ron? And you didn't keep any records of your own? Well, Old Hand Ron, psychologists John Bowlby and Mary Ainsworth did real scientific research which demonstrates otherwise: http://www.psycholog...nge_origins.pdf
It seems that insecure emotional attachment to the parents is the major factor. You are assigned to lower conditions, Ron.

"And (3) I recalled all my dietary and endocrine studies that I studied in those places the reporters have now agreed I never attended."
Like Sequoia University?

"Actually I recalled further than that. Roman troops marched on barley."
Great "whole track recall" Ron! But, historical records indicate otherwise. It seems the Roman Legion mostly consumed foods other than barley.
http://www.roman-emp.../army/army.html
http://romanmilitary.net/people/food
http://resourcesforh..._in_Britain.htm

"Barley is the highest protein cereal."
Thanks for authoritative advice, Ron, but scientific research demonstrates otherwise, again:
http://www.soilandhe...n/030210ch5.htm

Of all the cereal grains, oats ranks highest in protein and runs neck and neck with wheat as the all-around most nutritive cereal grain. The 1950 USDA handbook on grains rates oats at 14.5 percent protein, while whole wheat runs second with 13.4 percent. These figures are somewhat outdated now, especially in regard to oats. The average of 287 varieties selected from the World Oat Collection recently averaged 17 percent in protein content. More significantly, two new varieties, DAL from Wisconsin and OTEE from Illinois, contain over two percent more protein than that average, and can go as high as 22 percent on a dry basis. That could make oats almost competitive with soybeans in protein (soybeans contain about 35 percent protein but yield less per acre than oats) and most plant scientists express belief in a bright future for oats as human food.
Part of their reasoning is based on the character as well as the quality of oat protein. It has a bland taste, is soluble under acidic conditions, is stable in emulsions with water and fat, and holds moisture, thus making it an ideal protein to supplement other foods. At the USDA laboratory in Peoria, Illinois, researchers are using oat protein to make nutritious refreshment beverages, meat extenders, and high-protein baked goods.

"This formula is the nearest approach to human milk that can be assembled easily. It is an old Roman formula, no less, from maybe 2,200 years ago."
Oh, ya, Ron? It seems that there is no historical record of the barley water, homogenized milk, corn syrup formula. In fact, historical records indicate that Roman women either breast fed or employed wet nurses who did:
http://goliath.ecnex...man-empire.html
And corn syrup was invented around 1882:
http://www.corn.org/...ornrefining.htm

So, Ron, you nuclear physicist you, it seems you invented your baby food recipe out of your own delusions and conman lies. Thanks. Now we know.

#3 lamb

lamb

    Swamper

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 29 posts

Posted 19 September 2009 - 07:58 AM

And to think I used the formula blindly on my two children! There are so many things to regret once you break through the veil of mind control and actually see what you've swallowed whole!

#4 add1x

add1x

    Raw Meat

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 19 September 2009 - 10:27 AM

Hubbard introduced his infamous baby food recipe in The Auditor number 6 in an article ironically called "Healthy Babies".
Here are some article excerpts:
"Breast feeding babies may have a nostalgic background, particularly to a Freudian oriented medico, but real breast milk again is usually a poor ration"
Where is the published research study, Ron, that physicians who recommend breast feeding subscribe to Freud's doctrines? And where is the published research with a nutritional analysis of breast milk demonstrating that it is usually a poor ration? No facts? Flunk, Ron.

"Modern mothers smoke and sometimes drink. Smoking makes the milk very musty."
Which modern mothers smoke? Verifiable statistics please. And Ron, how would you know that smoking makes breast milk musty if you did not sample it yourself? How many lactating women did you taste test?

"Anyway, a nervous modern mother just can't deliver the right ration."
Published statistics please, Ron. Don't have any? You go to retread!

"The largest cause of upset in a baby's early life is just rations. As an old hand at this, I have straightened out more babies who were cross, not sleeping, getting sick and all, than it was easy to keep a record of."
No published research studies to demonstrate this, Ron? And you didn't keep any records of your own? Well, Old Hand Ron, psychologists John Bowlby and Mary Ainsworth did real scientific research which demonstrates otherwise: http://www.psycholog...nge_origins.pdf
It seems that insecure emotional attachment to the parents is the major factor. You are assigned to lower conditions, Ron.

"And (3) I recalled all my dietary and endocrine studies that I studied in those places the reporters have now agreed I never attended."
Like Sequoia University?

"Actually I recalled further than that. Roman troops marched on barley."
Great "whole track recall" Ron! But, historical records indicate otherwise. It seems the Roman Legion mostly consumed foods other than barley.
http://www.roman-emp.../army/army.html
http://romanmilitary.net/people/food
http://resourcesforh..._in_Britain.htm

"Barley is the highest protein cereal."
Thanks for authoritative advice, Ron, but scientific research demonstrates otherwise, again:
http://www.soilandhe...n/030210ch5.htm

Of all the cereal grains, oats ranks highest in protein and runs neck and neck with wheat as the all-around most nutritive cereal grain. The 1950 USDA handbook on grains rates oats at 14.5 percent protein, while whole wheat runs second with 13.4 percent. These figures are somewhat outdated now, especially in regard to oats. The average of 287 varieties selected from the World Oat Collection recently averaged 17 percent in protein content. More significantly, two new varieties, DAL from Wisconsin and OTEE from Illinois, contain over two percent more protein than that average, and can go as high as 22 percent on a dry basis. That could make oats almost competitive with soybeans in protein (soybeans contain about 35 percent protein but yield less per acre than oats) and most plant scientists express belief in a bright future for oats as human food.
Part of their reasoning is based on the character as well as the quality of oat protein. It has a bland taste, is soluble under acidic conditions, is stable in emulsions with water and fat, and holds moisture, thus making it an ideal protein to supplement other foods. At the USDA laboratory in Peoria, Illinois, researchers are using oat protein to make nutritious refreshment beverages, meat extenders, and high-protein baked goods.

"This formula is the nearest approach to human milk that can be assembled easily. It is an old Roman formula, no less, from maybe 2,200 years ago."
Oh, ya, Ron? It seems that there is no historical record of the barley water, homogenized milk, corn syrup formula. In fact, historical records indicate that Roman women either breast fed or employed wet nurses who did:
http://goliath.ecnex...man-empire.html
And corn syrup was invented around 1882:
http://www.corn.org/...ornrefining.htm

So, Ron, you nuclear physicist you, it seems you invented your baby food recipe out of your own delusions and conman lies. Thanks. Now we know.


Reading this crap soooo many years later - I could immediately see some of the contradictions - such as the use/invention of cornsyrup being way too late on the chain.

It still amazes me what wasn't seen (by self) and still isn't seen and is explained away so easily by scientologists. I didn't even see the "outpoint" of corn syrup then, and if I had I am sure would have explained it away by something along the lines of "well, we call it corn syrup now, but it was same thing just not called that..."

Thankfully, my children were breastfed by a rebel-scientology mother.

#5 Rhythm

Rhythm

    Midshipman

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 749 posts
  • LocationWestern Hemisphere

Posted 19 September 2009 - 04:14 PM

Reading this crap soooo many years later - I could immediately see some of the contradictions - such as the use/invention of cornsyrup being way too late on the chain.
It still amazes me what wasn't seen (by self) and still isn't seen and is explained away so easily by scientologists. I didn't even see the "outpoint" of corn syrup then, and if I had I am sure would have explained it away by something along the lines of "well, we call it corn syrup now, but it was same thing just not called that..."
Thankfully, my children were breastfed by a rebel-scientology mother.

add1x, good on your wife not buying into "old hand" Hubbard's advice on baby food.
Actually, corn is a grain from the Americas that did not exist in Europe and Africa prior to the return of Christopher Columbus to Spain in 1492.
http://www.campsilos...od3/index.shtml
Corn syrup could not have existed in any form in the Roman Empire.
So much for the factual recall of barn stormer, war hero, nuclear physicist, civil engineer, former Cecil Rhodes, former Elector of Saxony, former marcabian race car driver, L. Ron Hubbard.

#6 Rhythm

Rhythm

    Midshipman

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 749 posts
  • LocationWestern Hemisphere

Posted 20 September 2009 - 05:07 AM

Here is another medical research paper reporting on Hubbard's barley water formula without mentioning his name or scientology:
http://www.ncbi.nlm..../pubmed/6894664

Am J Dis Child. 1981 Jul;135(7):615-7.Links
Malnutrition associated with a formula of barley water, corn syrup, and whole milk.
Fabius RJ, Merritt RJ, Fleiss PM, Ashley JM.

Five infants, age 1 to 7 months, were given a formula of barley water, whole milk, and corn syrup (Karo) or honey. Three patients had subnormal growth, two fit the criteria for failure to thrive, and two demonstrated a microcytic hypochromic anemia. The delayed growth and anemia were corrected by institution of a standard infant formula and nutrient supplementation. The barley water formula provides less than the recommended daily allowance of iron and vitamins A and C. The illnesses of these infants and the deficiencies of the diet illustrate the importance of obtaining a careful dietary history for all infants not receiving standard diets.

#7 lamb

lamb

    Swamper

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 29 posts

Posted 20 September 2009 - 10:35 AM

So, with that knowledge in mind, could future lawsuits be forthcoming against CO$? After all, we were duped into harming our own children!

#8 Rhythm

Rhythm

    Midshipman

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 749 posts
  • LocationWestern Hemisphere

Posted 20 September 2009 - 05:35 PM

So, with that knowledge in mind, could future lawsuits be forthcoming against CO$? After all, we were duped into harming our own children!


Yes. Look into Fraud in the Inducement. There are no civil limitations on fraud.
This seems to also be a case of willful negligence on the part of David Miscavige, the Church of Spiritual Technology, Inc., Religious Technology Center, Inc. , and the Church of Scientology International, Inc.

Here is another excerpt from HCOB 28 April 1991 BARLEY FORMULA FOR BABIES
"..honey may be used instead of corn syrup.."
" Do not add anything else to this formula, such as vitamins or cream..."

Except that honey fed to infants can kill them. Here is a paper from the University of Florida:
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/AA142

Infant Botulism and Honey1
Malcolm T. Sanford2

Medical research has led doctors to conclude that one cause of so-called "crib death" or "sudden infant death syndrome" may in fact be due to infant botulism (food poisoning). A number of public health officials now believe there may be many unrecognized cases of this disease each year, and honey has been implicated as a cause in a few. Symptoms vary from mild to severe, but there have been no cases found in children over 26 weeks old. The Infectious Disease Section and Microbial Diseases Laboratory of the California Department of Health has provided evidence that botulism spores in the infant intestinal tract may produce the growing stage of the bacterium, Clostridium botulinum. This in turn manufactures a highly toxic poison. So far, this research indicates no reason why the disease is produced only in infants under seven months old.

Botulism spores are found everywhere in nature. They are not harmful themselves, but in the absence of oxygen (anaerobic conditions), the spores germinate and the resultant bacteria produce a powerful poison. This is the reason all canned vegetables are heated prior to packing.

Raw agricultural crops, however, are never heated. And many foods, even if heated or processed, once exposed to the air would be susceptible to re-infestation by botulism spores. Cumulative research to date on infant botulism, therefore, suggests that there is an unknown risk factor in feeding any raw agricultural product, including honey, to infants under one year of age.

Although honey has been blamed as a source of spores in a few infant botulism cases, some medical officials are not totally convinced about its role in the disease. Dr. Roger Feldman of the Federal Center for Disease Control (CDC) has stated that the data are not yet strong enough for the CDC to issue a warning about honey. But, he said, parents should be aware of the findings so they can make their own decisions. There may be other foods involved and honey may be no risk at all. We just don't known.

These research findings in no way alter many published results that honey is a highly nutritious food source or that it is bactericidal. Only bacterial spores which are highly resistant to environmental stress can exist in honey and they themselves are not harmful. No other disease besides infant botulism has been linked to honey. The risk of this disease appears to be extremely small.

The individual beekeeper can do little except be prepared to responsibly answer questions about infant botulism and honey. In all conscience he/she probably should refrain from advocating the use of honey in the feeding of infants less than one year old. This is something best left to the discretion of the parent and pediatrician. If the beekeeper is a packer or dealer in honey, he/she may profit by looking into the adequacy and his/her product liability insurance. A white paper entitled, "Honey in Relation to Infant Botulism," by E. M. Foster is available from The National Honey Board, 421 21st Avenue Num. 203, Longmont, CO 80501-1421, phone 303/776-2337.

Footnotes
1.
This document is ENY128, one of a series of the Entomology and Nematology Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Reviewed May 1, 2003. Visit the EDIS Web Site at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu.

2.
Malcolm T. Sanford, professor, Entomology and Nematology Department, Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville FL 32611.

#9 Rhythm

Rhythm

    Midshipman

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 749 posts
  • LocationWestern Hemisphere

Posted 25 September 2009 - 04:56 PM

Here is a scan of the first page of the article in the Journal of Tropical Pediatrics 1978 24(2):89-91; doi:10.1093/tropej/24.2.89 by Oxford University Press. It is called, "Barley Water Babies, a Commerciogenic Condition?" by Martin Schweiger and William Cutting.
The point of this article seems to be that barley water as a baby food results in malnutrition. This is not the same as Hubbard's barley water formula, but the point is, when milk is diluted with something less nutricious, the mixture is less nutricious than milk. Hubbard's recipe produces a concoction that is only 36% milk, but 54% barley water.
barleywaterbabies.jpeg

#10 Homeward Bound

Homeward Bound

    Gone and not forgotten

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 31 posts

Posted 26 September 2009 - 12:40 PM

And to think I used the formula blindly on my two children! There are so many things to regret once you break through the veil of mind control and actually see what you've swallowed whole!


I can't help but have a similar feeling here.

I had a daughter born in the Sea Org and after a time we put her on that insane barley formula because it was LRH who recommended it. I feel completely betrayed and like a fool that I did this and can only hope that it has no lasting negative effects in my daughter.

Some years later I consented to having my daughter do the purif rundown. Again, because I blindly believed in Hubbard's "brilliance", I risked harm to the person I loved the most.

It sickens me to realize now that Hubbard was not only incompetent in these areas but he also was a fraud, pretending great knowledge that he did not have.

His constant lies about his accomplishments, his education, his war record, and his life in general serve to paint a false picture of one who cares more about his own "status", money, etc. than he does others. It is a huge betrayal of the trust we all put in him on these subjects and many more I am sure.

He preached often of what a wonderful man he was who took no money for his work for organized scientology, while through back channels tens of millions of dollars was secretly funneled to him for what amounts to little or no exchange of value. And countless people were beaten, gang bang sec checked, extorted, threatened with loss of family and otherwise abused so as to get money to this man.

How sick is this!

I believe that it is incumbent on those of us who know of such things as the above, to speak out and do something to help prevent these abuses and dangerous practices from being used on others, this time to line the pockets or otherwise the "power-base" of David Miscavige.

#11 Rhythm

Rhythm

    Midshipman

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 749 posts
  • LocationWestern Hemisphere

Posted 28 September 2009 - 11:25 PM

Hubbard coined the term "overt product" for something that was useless or produced destructive results. I think his recipe for infant formula is a prime example of that. His formula consists of 15 ounces of barley water, 10 ounces of homogenized milk, and 3 ounces of corn syrup. Hubbard's baby formula contains about 11% corn syrup. What are the dangers of feeding a baby this nasty mix?

http://www.karosyrup...text.html#forth
"Corn syrup is a mildly sweet, concentrated solution of dextrose and other sugars derived from corn starch. It is naturally sweet. Corn syrup contains between 15% to 20% dextrose (glucose) and a mixture of various other types of sugar."

Sugar can suppress the immune system.
Sanchez, A., et al. "Role of Sugars in Human Neutrophilic Phagocytosis," Am J Clin Nutr. Nov 1973;261:1180-1184.
Bernstein, J., et al. "Depression of Lymphocyte Transformation Following Oral Glucose Ingestion." Am J Clin Nutr. 1997;30:613.

Sugar upsets the mineral relationships in the body.
Couzy, F., et al."Nutritional Implications of the Interaction Minerals," Progressive Food and Nutrition Science. 17;1933:65-87.

Sugar can cause hyperactivity, anxiety, difficulty concentrating, and crankiness in children.
Goldman, J., et al. "Behavioral Effects of Sucrose on Preschool Children." J Abnormal Child Psychol. 1986;14(4):565-577.

Sugar contributes to the reduction in defense against bacterial infection (infectious diseases).
Ringsdorf, W., Cheraskin, E. and Ramsay R. "Sucrose, Neutrophilic Phagocytosis and Resistance to Disease," Dental Surv. 1976;52(12):46-48.

Sugar interferes with absorption of calcium and magnesium.
Lemann, J. "Evidence that Glucose Ingestion Inhibits Net Renal Tubular Reabsorption of Calcium and Magnesium." Am J Clin Nutr. 1976 ;70:236-245.

Sugar can cause a rapid rise of adrenaline levels in children.
Jones, T. W., et al. “Enhanced Adrenomedullary Response and Increased Susceptibility to Neuroglygopenia: Mechanisms Underlying the Adverse Effect of Sugar Ingestion in Children.” J Pediatrics. Feb 1995;126:171-7.

Sugar can cause tooth decay.
Glinsmann, W., et al. “Evaluation of Health Aspects of Sugar Contained in Carbohydrate Sweeteners.” F. D. A. Report of Sugars Task Force. 1986:39.
Makinen K.K.,et al. “A Descriptive Report of the Effects of a 16_month Xylitol Chewing_Gum Programme Subsequent to a 40_Month Sucrose Gum Programme.” Caries Research. 1998; 32(2)107-12.
Riva Touger-Decker and Cor van Loveren, “Sugars and Dental Caries.”
Am. J. Clin.Nutr. Oct 2003; 78:881-892.

Sugar contributes to obesity.
Keen, H., et al. "Nutrient Intake, Adiposity, and Diabetes." Brit Med J. 1989; 1: 655-658.

Sugar can cause asthma.
Cheng, J., et al. “Preliminary Clinical Study on the Correlation Between Allergic Rhinitis and Food Factors.” Lin Chuang Er Bi Yan Hou Ke Za Zhi Aug 2002;16(8):393-396.

Sugar can lower the amount of Vitamin E (alpha-Tocopherol) in the blood.
Mohanty P. et al. “Glucose Challenge Stimulates Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Generation by Leucocytes.” J Clin Endocrin Metabol. Aug 2000; 85(8):2970-2973.

Sugar can decrease growth hormone.
Gardner, L. and Reiser, S. "Effects of Dietary Carbohydrate on Fasting Levels of Human Growth Hormone and Cortisol." Proc Soc Exp Biol Med. 1982;169:36-40.

Sugar can interfere with the absorption of protein.
Lee AT, Cerami A. “Role of Glycation in Aging.” Ann N Y Acad Sci. Nov 21, 1992;663:63-70.

Sugar can contribute to diabetes.
Henriksen H. B. and, Kolset S.O. Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. Sep 6, 2007;127(17):2259-62.

Sugar can change the structure of protein.
Monnier, V. M. "Nonenzymatic Glycosylation, the Maillard Reaction and the Aging Process." J Gerontol. 1990:45(4 ):105-110.

Sugar can make our skin age by changing the structure of collagen.
Dyer, D. G., et al. "Accumulation of Maillard Reaction Products in Skin Collagen in Diabetes and Aging." J Clin Invest. 1993:93(6):421-422.

Sugar can cause headaches, including migraine.
Grand, E. "Food Allergies and Migraine." Lancet. 1979:1:955-959.

Sugar can cause depression.
Peet, M. "International Variations in the Outcome of Schizophrenia and the Prevalence of Depression in Relation to National Dietary Practices: An Ecological Analysis." Brit J Psych. 2004;184:404-408.

A diet high in refined sugar reduces learning capacity.
Molteni, R, et al. “A High-fat, Refined Sugar Diet Reduces Hippocampal Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor, Neuronal Plasticity, and Learning.” NeuroScience. 2002;112(4):803-814.

Decrease in sugar intake can increase emotional stability.
Christensen L. et al. “Impact of A Dietary Change on Emotional Distress.” J Abnor Psychol. 1985;94(4):565-79.

Sugar adversely affects urinary electrolyte composition.
Blacklock, N. J. “Sucrose and Idiopathic Renal Stone.” Nutrition and Health. 1987;5(1 & 2):9-17.

Sugar dehydrates newborns.
"Gluconeogenesis in Very Low Birth Weight Infants Receiving Total Parenteral Nutrition.” Diabetes. 1999 Apr;48(4):791-800.

Exposing a newborn to sugar results in a heightened preference for sucrose relative to water.
Booth, D.A.M. et al. “Sweetness and Food Selection: Measurement of Sweeteners’ Effects on Acceptance.” Sweetness. Dobbing, J., Ed., (London:Springer-Verlag, 1987).

Sugar can cause fatigue, moodiness, nervousness and depression.
Krietsch, K., et al. “Prevalence, Presenting Symptoms, and Psychological Characteristics of Individuals Experiencing a Diet-related Mood-disturbance.” Behavior Therapy 1988;19(4): 593-604.

#12 Rhythm

Rhythm

    Midshipman

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 749 posts
  • LocationWestern Hemisphere

Posted 29 September 2009 - 12:13 AM

The infant formula that Hubbard invented and advocates fails to meet U.S. Federal requirements for nutrition:

Under 21 U.S.C. 321(z), infant formula is defined as:
"a food that purports to be or is represented for special dietary use solely as a food for infants by reason of its simulation of human milk or its suitability as a complete or partial substitute for human milk."

Those requirements are listed in CFR Title 21 section 107.100
http://www.accessdat....cfm?fr=107.100
Attached File  CFRtitle21107100.html   29.63KB   179 downloads

#13 Rhythm

Rhythm

    Midshipman

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 749 posts
  • LocationWestern Hemisphere

Posted 08 October 2009 - 04:07 PM

http://health.usnews...iolence-in.html
Excerpt:
"Researchers from Cardiff University in Wales looked at data on 17,415 children born in a single week during April 1970 in the United Kingdom. The data, from the British Cohort Study, included detailed health and lifestyle information on the children at several points during their lifetimes, including ages 5, 10 and throughout adulthood.

Thirty-five of those children went on to report at age 34 that they'd been convicted of a violent crime, the researchers found.

About 69 percent of those who reported having committed violent acts also reported eating candy daily at age 10, compared to 42 percent of those who did not have a violent criminal past, the study authors noted.

"There appears to be a link between childhood diet and adult violence, although the nature of the mechanism underlying this association needs further scrutiny," said study author Simon Moore, a senior lecturer in the Violence and Society Research Group at Cardiff University.

Researchers from Cardiff University in Wales looked at data on 17,415 children born in a single week during April 1970 in the United Kingdom. The data, from the British Cohort Study, included detailed health and lifestyle information on the children at several points during their lifetimes, including ages 5, 10 and throughout adulthood.

Thirty-five of those children went on to report at age 34 that they'd been convicted of a violent crime, the researchers found.

About 69 percent of those who reported having committed violent acts also reported eating candy daily at age 10, compared to 42 percent of those who did not have a violent criminal past, the study authors noted.

The research, published in the October issue of the British Journal of Psychiatry, is the first to look at childhood nutrition and violent behavior, according to the study."

Another reason for Hubbard's corn syrup laden barley water infant formula to be condemned.

#14 revenimus

revenimus

    Swamper

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 42 posts

Posted 13 October 2009 - 07:47 PM

The Barley water solution is just another classic example of L. Ron Hubbard's quack physical and psychological therapy combined. There's zero evidence any of that works. I am though pretty astonished that no kids have ever been sickened by it.

#15 Rhythm

Rhythm

    Midshipman

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 749 posts
  • LocationWestern Hemisphere

Posted 13 October 2009 - 09:58 PM

The Barley water solution is just another classic example of L. Ron Hubbard's quack physical and psychological therapy combined. There's zero evidence any of that works. I am though pretty astonished that no kids have ever been sickened by it.


Actually, a number have been sickened by it. One medical journal article was the impetus for this thread and I later found another. See posts number 1 and 6.

#16 Rhythm

Rhythm

    Midshipman

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 749 posts
  • LocationWestern Hemisphere

Posted 05 October 2013 - 04:55 PM

Looks like Kelly Preston has departed from standard scientology by not applying Hubbard's baby tech and breast fed her son. 

http://www.celebitch...and_corn_syrup/






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users