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Why Hubbard opposed collaborative learning


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#1 Rhythm

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Posted 25 June 2011 - 01:42 PM

First the research references:
Blaye, A., Light, P.H., Joiner, R., & Sheldon, S. (1991). Joint planning and problem solving on a computer-based task. British Jounal of Developmental Psychology, 9, 471-483.
Gerlach, J.M. (1994). Is this collaboration? In K. Bosworth & S.J. Hamilton (Eds.) Collaborative learning: Underlying processes and effective techniques (Vol. 59, pp. 5-14). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
Gokhale, A. A. (1995) Collaborative learning enhances critical thinking. Journal of Technology Education, 7, 22-30.
Matthews, R. S., Cooper, J. L., Davidson, N., & Hawkes, P. (1995, July/August). Building bridges between cooperative and collaborative learning. Change, 2, 35-40.
Miyake, N. (1986). Constructive interaction and the iterative process of understanding. Cognitive Science: A Multidisciplinary Journal, 10, 151-177.

The citations are all peer-reviewed professional research journals.

#2 Rhythm

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Posted 25 June 2011 - 01:54 PM

It's pretty obvious why Hubbard did not employ collaborative learning in scientology. It does not facilitate brainwashing, but rather, improves critical thinking, ability to see an issue from different points of view, and increases problem-solving ability.

http://www.accessmyl...y-practice.html
Translating career theory to practice: the risk of unintentional social injustice.
Journal of Counseling and Development June 22, 2011 | Sampson, James P., Jr.; Dozier, V. Casey; Colvin, Gloria P. p. 333
"Collaborative learning. Social interaction is a key element of the collaborative learning process. Collaborative learning is a naturally occurring social act whereby learning occurs through conversation (Gerlach, 1994). The process of collaborative learning require the active involvement of the learner. Active involvement in learning has been shown to be more effective than passively receiving information. (Matthews, Cooper, Davidson, & Hawkes, 1995). Evidence shows that collaborative learning has a positive impact on learning outcomes. Students have been shown to perform better when collaborating than when working individually. This type of learning also contributes to improved problem-solving ability as individuals are exposed to differing interpretations of a similar situation. (Gokhale, 1995). Students with prior collaborative learning experience showed more evidence of planning and problem-solving skills than students who had worked alone (Blaye, Light, Joiner, & Sheldon, 1991). The tendency to self-critique and reflect occurred four times more often during collaborative learning than when individuals learned alone (Miyake, 1986). The capacity to reflect and gain insight is an important aspect of clarifying self-knowledge in making choices, including career choices."




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